Study of Vma on Self Compacting Concrete

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Study Of Vma On Self Compacting Concrete

Study of Vma on Self Compacting Concrete

Abstract

Study Of Vma On Self Compacting Concrete

Study Of Vma On Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) has gained considerable attention in the concrete industry over the past several years in order to overcome the problems associated with conventional vibrated concrete (CVC). In the early 1980s, Japanese researchers initially advocated the concept of SCC and shortly thereafter developed and introduced it as a construction material.

The term “self-compacting concrete” refers to a “new” special type of concrete mix characterized by high resistance to segregation that can spread, fill the formwork, and encapsulate reinforcement without any mechanical consolidation. In addition, it must maintain its homogeneity during transportation, placing and healing to ensure adequate structural performance and long-term durability.

Researchers have established guidelines for SCC mix proportioning, which include a reduction in the volume ratio of aggregate to cement material, an increase in paste volume and water cement ratio (w / c), careful control of the maximum coarse aggregate particle size and total volume, and the use of various modified viscosity admixtures (VMA). To obtain a high flow rate, it is generally necessary to use superplasticizers for SCC.

Adding a large volume of powdered material or admixture modifying viscosity can eliminate segregation. Fly ash, silica fume, lime stone powder, glass filler and quartzite filler and others are the powdered materials that can be added. One of SCC’s limitations is that there is no established mix design procedure yet. Literature available to date reveals that the general procedure for SCC design mixes is based on keeping the coarse aggregate and fine aggregate content fixed at a certain ratio and that self-compactibility is to be achieved by adjusting the water / powder ratio and superplasticizer dosage.

Conclusion

SCC’s initial cost is 10-15% higher than conventional concrete because most consumers do not choose it. We concluded with the experiments that the end cost of total construction using SCC is less than conventional concrete.