Improving the Strength of Subgrade Using Building Debris

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Improving The Strength Of Subgrade Using Building Debris

Improving the Strength of Subgrade Using Building Debris

Abstract

This Improving The Strength Of Subgrade Using Building Debris paper covers use of waste glass bottles to modify the properties of poor subgrade soils. The study involved grinding waste glass bottles into powder in two categories based on particle size.

The results showed that the increase in glass powder content increases the strength of the subgrade soil and decreases its susceptibility to volume change. Using S2-powder, however, revealed better results than S1-powder results.

Waste glass bottles were collected from trash and powdered in two particle size categories: S1 includes glass particles between 425μm and 75μm, and S2 includes particles below 75μm. Five different content (4%, 8%, 12%, 16%, and 20% by weight of dry soil) of glass powder has been added to a relatively poor subgrade soil to alter its properties.

The results showed that the increase of glass powder content significantly improves the properties. However, S2-powder (the finer one) showed better results than those shown by S1-powder in terms of increase in strength and decrease in volume change susceptibility of modified subgrade soils. Modified samples with 20 percent of S1-powder.

Conclusion

Waste glass bottles were collected from trash and powdered in two particle size categories: S1 includes glass particles between 425μm and 75μm, and S2 includes particles below 75μm. Five different content (4%, 8%, 12%, 16%, and 20% by weight of dry soil) of glass powder has been added to a relatively poor subgrade soil to alter its properties.

  • When the subgrade is strengthened with CDW and CKD, and subbase of CDW and CKD is used, for the most economical pavement design, a reduction of 12 inches of subbase thickness is achieved while keeping the top two layer thicknesses the same.
  • When the subgrade is strengthened with CDW and CKD, and subbase of CDW and CKD is used, for commonly used layer thicknesses, a reduction of 2 inches is gained both in the thicknesses of surface course and base course.