Concreting Practices In Belgaum – A Case Study

0
262
Concreting Practices In Belgaum – A Case Study

Concreting Practices In Belgaum – A Case Study

Abstract

Concreting Practices In Belgaum – A Case Study civil project report Cross-stitching is a technique applied to an existing concrete pavement, primarily to longitudinal cracks and joints to prevent them from opening up. The causes of joints and cracks opening up are related to the daily and seasonal temperature and moisture cycles in the concrete slabs, vehicles that apply lateral shear forces during turning operations, differential settlements, and infiltration of incompressibles into the crack or joint. Tiebars are specified to control and prevent longitudinal joints from opening up. Normally, the tiebars are very effective and no significant widening occurs. However, sometimes tiebars are not specified or a construction problem occurs and bars are either left out or placed too low in the slabs to be effective.

Conclusion

Concreting Practices In Belgaum – A Case Study civil project report Cross-stitching has produced a significant increase in the life of longitudinally cracked slabs and for longitudinal joints with no or ineffective tiebars through holding them tightly together over 10 to 20+ years. The Kansas inspection and acceptance procedures are observational but are fairly straightforward and effective. Slab thickness is a key input to proper cross-stitching. The State and contractor staff interviewed believe that the specifications are adequate and produce long-lasting cross-stitching and prevent crack and joint opening over many future years.